Working Together to End Homelessness for Domestic and Sexual Violence Survivors and Their Families

Survivors of violence face real barriers when trying to access safe housing – barriers caused by the power and control dynamics of abuse, a need for safety and confidentiality, economic instability, the effects of trauma, and the lack of affordable housing in communities. Nobody should have to choose between staying in an unsafe home and having no home at all.

Welcome to Safe Housing Partnerships, the new website for the Domestic Violence and Housing Technical Assistance Consortium! We hope you find useful resources and tools that advance your work at the critical intersection of domestic violence, sexual assault, homelessness, and housing. Please check back frequently, as we’ll be continuously adding to the site over the coming months.

Staff Picked Resources

A Promising Approach to Prevent Homelessness for Domestic Violence Survivors

2016
Cris Sullivan
Heather Bomsta
Peg Hacskaylo

This presentation describes how flexible funds are employed in a DV housing program in Washington DC as a means to prevent homelessness for survivors. Further, it discusses the elements and results of a longitudinal pilot study that tested whether this project (DASH's Survivor Resiliency Fund) represents a promising strategy to prevent homelessness for survivors of intimate partner violence.

From Organizational Culture to Survivor Outcomes: A Process And Outcome Evaluation Of The District Alliance For Safe Housing

2016
Nkiru Nnawulezi

The District Alliance for Safe Housing (DASH) is a large, community-based organization located in Washington, D.C. It aims to provide services that promote self-determination, autonomy and safety for all survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV), sexual assault, sex trafficking, same-sex IPV, and homelessness. DASH also engages in systems advocacy to increase survivors’ safe housing options throughout the housing continuum. DASH uses low-barrier, voluntary, trauma-informed approaches to service delivery in order to enact their core beliefs:integrity, sovereignty, empowerment, accountability, partnerships, compassion, and re-centering. In 2013, evaluators from Michigan State University’s Research Consortium on Gender Based Violence collaborated with DASH to implement a process and outcome evaluation of DASH's program model. This document summarizes their findings.

Technology and Confidentiality Resources Toolkit for Nonprofit Victim Service Agencies and Advocates

National Network to End Domestic Violence

Privacy and confidentiality is paramount to safety for victims and survivors of domestic and sexual violence. Yet victim service agencies may need to share information in many ways: with community partners, within community coordinated response teams, through referrals to other service providers, or in community-wide data collection initiatives. This website provides guidance for agencies in understanding their obligations to confidentiality in accordance to federal laws, best practices to ensure survivor-centered services, when and how much information to keep, and how best to share information with others.

Popular Resource Categories

The intersection between domestic and sexual violence, LGBTQ oppression, and youth homelessness is marked - and concerns for their children are on top of the list for survivors. This section includes materials focused on children and youth and how to better understand and meet their needs.

Leaving home can have destabilizing impacts on survivors and their children. Helping survivors remain in the safe housing they have achieved is a promising alternative.

Funders require compliance with many laws and guidelines – from language access to data collection. Additionally, many promising practices can help shape your program.