Coordinated Entry and Intake/Assessment Tools

Aimed at ensuring access to housing services that match the need of each unique household, Coordinated Entry Systems vary across communities as to how survivors of domestic and sexual violence are considered.

= web resource    = downloadable file

HUD Coordinated Entry Guidebook

2017
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

This Coordinated Entry Guidebook focuses on the four core elements of Access, Assessment, Prioritization, and Referral. It covers basic requirements and advanced considerations for each core element. This Guidebook is intended to be a comprehensive tool for CoCs that are designing and implementing coordinated entry. The Guidebook also is intended for CoCs that have already made significant progress in planning coordinated entry, as well as those that have already implemented it. CoCs should use the Guidebook as a reference to ensure their coordinated entry process complies with all of HUD’s requirements.

HUD FAQ: Coordinated Entry and Victim Service Providers

2015
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Coordinated entry is a process developed to ensure all people experiencing a housing crisis have fair and equal access to the community’s housing and homeless assistance resources. Coordinated entry processes also help communities prioritize assistance based on vulnerability and severity of service needs. Victim service providers play an integral part in their community’s housing and homeless response system. This document answers several frequently asked questions around the integration of victim service providers in their community’s coordinated entry process.

FAQ - Coordinated Entry (CE) Process: A Resource for Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Service Providers

2017
National Alliance for Safe Housing
National Network to End Domestic Violence
National Resource Center on Domestic Violence
Collaborative Solutions

This FAQ tool has been developed in response to questions the Consortium has received from DV/SA advocates who are interesting in learning more about the Homeless Continuum of Care coordinated entry (CE) requirements and process to promote CE access and safe housing options for survivors. The FAQ draws from regulations and other guidance from HUD and USICH and offers strategies and resources for DV/SA providers who want to contribute to the creation and implementation of the CE process in their communities.

Coordinated Entry Toolkit

Building Changes

The toolkit was constructed to provide a framework that counties in the state of Washington can use to construct coordinated entry systems that reflect best practices and respond to the unique needs of their communities. The Building Changes toolkit offers guidance on Planning, Implementing, Data Collection, and Evaluation.

Checklist: Incorporating Domestic Violence Providers into a Coordinated Assessment Process

2013
National Alliance to End Homelessness

This document is a checklist for Continuums of Care to use to make certain that they are considering and incorporating the needs of households fleeing domestic violence and other similar forms of assault and harassment into their coordinated assessment processes. Systems should also ensure they are including domestic violence providers in the discussion of how the assessment system is structured from the beginning.

Access to Early Childhood Development Services for Homeless Families with Young Children: An Exploratory Project

2016
Tanya de Sousa

This policy brief summarizes selected literature on homeless families with children who are less than five years old, and incorporates findings from a project prepared for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Administration for Children and Families (ACF) on the challenges facing families with young children who are temporarily staying with others or in motels/hotels. The aim of this policy brief is to examine the following questions from the project: (1) What are families’ current living arrangements, and do they have alternative plans for shelter if they cannot stay at their current temporary location and are unable to receive the services of a shelter? (2) What conditions are homeless families and children exposed to when they cannot or do not access the services of a shelter? (3) To what extent are families knowledgeable about the federally sponsored early childhood support services available to them?

Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive! A Housing and Shelter Provider’s Guide to Developmental and Behavioral Screening

2014
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
U.S. Department of Education

As shelter and housing assistance providers help vulnerable children, youth and families exit homelessness and partner with these families as they work to obtain permanent housing, it's important to talk to families about their child’s development. If developmental concerns are caught early, providers can help ensure that children are linked to the appropriate services and receive the extra support they may need. Partnering with families and specialists to learn the signs and act early will assure that children have the best possible start to a bright future. This Developmental and Behavioral Screening Guide has been specifically designed for shelter and housing assistance providers. In this guide, you will find information on how to engage clients with children under age 5 in conversations regarding the developmental and behavioral health of their children, and how to facilitate referrals for further screening and evaluation when required.