Rapid Re-Housing, Housing First, Housing Tax Credits, and Other Affordable Housing Approaches

Once consisting primarily of shelter, responses to homelessness and housing instability are now many and varied. 

= web resource    = downloadable file

Creating Permanent Supportive Housing to Meet the Needs of Survivors of Domestic Violence: A Toolkit for Housing Developers, Architects, Property Managers, and Housing Service Providers

2021
Downtown Women's Center
National Alliance for Safe Housing

To address this gap, the Downtown Women’s Center (DWC) and the National Alliance for Safe Housing (NASH) partnered in 2019 to develop this Toolkit as a best practice resource for housing developers, property managers, and service providers involved in building and operating Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) for domestic violence (DV) survivors. As the first of its kind, the Toolkit also includes recommendations for involving survivors in the development of trauma-informed PSH programs, to better meet the need for effective permanent housing options in addition to shelter, transitional housing, and rapid re-housing models.

 

Creating Permanent Supportive Housing to Meet the Needs of Survivors of Domestic Violence: Executive Summary

2021
Downtown Women's Center
National Alliance for Safe Housing

Despite growing research into the intersection of domestic violence and homelessness, there remains a lack of published guidance on permanent housing solutions that respond to survivors' needs in attaining housing and personal stability. To address this gap, the Downtown Women’s Center and the National Alliance for Safe Housing partnered in 2019 to develop this Toolkit as a best practice resource for housing developers, property managers, and service providers involved in building and operating Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) for domestic violence (DV) survivors. As the first of its kind, the Toolkit also includes recommendations for involving survivors in the development of trauma-informed PSH programs, to better meet the need for effective permanent housing options in addition to shelter, transitional housing, and rapid re-housing models.

 

NEWS: An Exemplar of the DV Housing First Model

2019
Gabriela Lopez-Zeron
Cris Sullivan
Michigan State University Research Consortium on Gender-based Violence

In 2017, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) funded 33 non-profit agencies to implement the Domestic Violence Housing First (DVHF) model. As part of a statewide evaluation of the DVHF model, NEWS is being highlighted as an exemplar of their outstanding work in the three pillars of the model. NEWS, located in Napa Valley, California, is dedicated to providing safety, hope, healing, and empowerment for survivors of domestic and sexual abuse.

Rapid Re-Housing: Considerations for Homeless Service Providers Supporting Families Impacted by Domestic Violence

2018
Kris Billhardt

Rapid Rehousing is a key intervention in our work to end homelessness and an essential tool to support survivors of domestic violence experiencing homelessness. This paper provides guidance to service providers, Continuums of Care, and policy makers to support them in making adaptations to accommodate the unique needs of survivors. 

Developing Affordable Housing for Survivors of Domestic Violence

2018
Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence
National Network to End Domestic Violence

The Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence has been very successful in developing a range of housing options for survivors across the state.  Today they sponsor 72 unites of housing for survivors at five locations with more units under development.This webinar highlights KCADV’s process and strategies they took to go from tax credit neophyte to housing sponsor.

Developing Housing for Survivors of Domestic Violence

2018
Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence
National Network to End Domestic Violence

This resource outlines how a partnership between one housing finance agency, two nonprofit housing developers, and two housing authorities led to 84 apartments for low-income families impacted by domestic violence in the State of Kentucky.

Available in Korean: 가정 폭력 생존자를 위한 주택 개발

Available in Spanish: Desarrollo de viviendas para personas sobrevivientes de la violencia doméstica

 

Evaluation of LifeWire's DV Rapid Re-Housing Project

2018
Cris Sullivan
Jennifer Strom
Stephanie Fluegeman

In 2015, the King County Housing Authority used its Moving to Work funds to implement a Domestic Violence Housing First Rapid Re-Housing Demonstration Project with LifeWire. Moving to Work is a demonstration program for public housing authorities that allows them to test innovative, locally-designed interventions created to stabilize housing. This report includes data and key findings from an evaluation of that program.

RESEARCH BRIEF: 'There's Just All These Moving Parts:' Helping Domestic Violence Survivors Obtain Housing

2018
Cris Sullivan
Gabriela Lopez-Zeron
Heather Bomsta
Anne Menard

Advocates working with domestic violence (DV) survivors to obtain housing are committed to the principles of Housing First and Rapid Rehousing that recommend getting clients into permanent housing as quickly as possible. They struggle, however, with how “as quickly as possible” may be defined by funders and policy makers who do not fully understand the intricacies of their efforts. The purpose of this study was to better understand the complexities involved in helping IPV survivors obtain safe and stable housing.

Domestic Violence Housing First

Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence

WSCADV's Domestic Violence Housing First approach focuses on getting survivors of domestic violence into stable housing as quickly as possible, and then providing the necessary support as they rebuild their lives. This web page provides an overview of WSCADV's work to implement this approach in Washington state and includes resources, toolkits, and evaluation of the impact of their projects.

Common Ground, Complementary Approaches: Adapting the Housing First Model for Domestic Violence Survivors

2017
Cris Sullivan
Linda Olsen

The Housing First model has been shown to be a highly effective approach to achieving permanent housing for chronically homeless individuals with serious mental illness and chemical dependency. There are numerous components of the model that lend themselves toward achieving similar goals for homeless domestic violence (DV) survivors and their children. A leading cause of homelessness for women, many of whom are mothers, is DV. This article describes the commonalities between the Housing First model and the tenets of DV victim advocacy work and explores how Housing First can be adapted to effectively achieve safe and stable housing for DV survivors and their children. Preliminary evidence for the adapted model – termed Domestic Violence Housing First – is provided, and policy implications are discussed.

Domestic Violence Housing First Toolkit

2017
Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence

The Domestic Violence Housing First (DVHF) approach focuses on getting survivors of domestic violence into stable housing as quickly as possible and then continuing to provide support as they rebuild their lives. With safe and stable housing at its core, the key components of DVHF include: survivor-driven, trauma informed, mobile advocacy; flexible financial assistance; and community engagement. This toolkit is designed to provide materials and resources for organizations to use when developing or implementing the DVHF approach.

Mainstream Practice: Highlights from the LGBTQ DV Capacity Building learning Center Literature Review

2015
National LGBTQ Domestic Violence Capacity Building Learning Center

This article summarizes and analyzes the body of literature from the mainstream DV movement and discusses its insights, models, and cautionary tales in terms of their applicability to LGBTQ IPV. Includes discussion of DV shelter models and new low-barrier approaches such as DV Housing First.

Best Practice Guideline for Ending Women’s and Girl’s Homelessness

2015
Amy Van Berkum
Abe Oudshoorn

This report synthesizes existing literature on the gendered experience of homelessness in an effort to develop best practices for ending women’s and girl’s homelessness, including the applicability of Housing First and Trauma Informed Care approaches. The authors present an overview of commonalities noted amongst several particular populations of women experiencing homelessness. Particular populations are then examined in relation to their pathways into homelessness, barriers in exiting homelessness, housing preferences and suggestions, service preferences and suggestions, and research and recommendations for the future.

Across the Continuum: Recommendations on Housing for Survivors of Domestic Violence in Florida

2014
Carol Wick, et al.

This report was created to document and make recommendations to address the housing needs of survivors of domestic abuse throughout Florida. The authors assert that survivors of domestic abuse are affected by a unique type of homelessness and that the continuum of housing options that should be provided differs from someone who is homeless for economic or other reasons. Ideally, all housing options should address the safety, economic and physical recovery needs of the individual survivor and their children and pets.

Domestic Violence Housing First: The Intersection of Domestic Violence and Homelessness

2013
Linda Olsen
Chiquita Rollins
Kris Billhardt

This is the first of a series of papers published by the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the Volunteers of America Home Free Program in Portland, OR. This paper chronicles the histories of the battered women's movement and the anti-homelessness movement, how they have intertwined, and how they can join together to meet shared goals.

Responding to the Call for Safe Housing

2012
District Alliance for Safe Housing

DASH was established in response to the shortage of basic housing services for survivors in the District of Columbia. This report chronicles the progress achieved over a fine-year period in DASH's primary goals: 1. Increase the supply of safe emergency, transitional, and supportive permanent housing for all domestic violence survivors and their children; 2. Build the capacity of all existing housing programs for women in the District, to be safe housing programs for survivors; and 3. Provide domestic violence training to staff at nonresidential programs serving diverse and specific populations.

Rapid Re-Housing Know-How

2016
National Alliance to End Homelessness

This link connects readers to a variety of webinars, blogs, toolkits, and fact sheets regarding rapid re-housing. Includes information for providers as well as funders.

Rapid Re-Housing Performance Benchmarks and Program Standards

2016
National Alliance to End Homelessness

The core components of a rapid re-housing program (housing identification, move-in and rent assistance, and rapid re-housing case management and services) represent the minimum that a program must be providing. This document provides details on performance benchmarks that would qualify a program as effective. These benchmarks are accompanied by qualitative program standards to help a program meet the performance benchmarks. Includes a section on program philosophy and design standards that provide more guidance on the broader role a rapid re-housing program should play in ending homelessness.

Core Components of Rapid Re-Housing

2014
National Alliance to End Homelessness

Rapid re-housing is an intervention designed to help individuals and families to quickly exit homelessness and return to permanent housing. Rapid re-housing assistance is offered without preconditions (such as employment, income, absence of criminal record, or sobriety) and the resources and services provided are typically tailored to the unique needs of the household. This paper describes the core components of a rapid re-housing program: housing identification; rent and move-in assistance; and rapid re-housing case management and services.

The Housing First Checklist

2013
U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness

This tool is intended for use by policymakers, government officials, and practitioners alike to help make a basic assessment of whether and to what degree a particular housing program is employing a Housing First approach. Use this tool as a checklist that can be reviewed during a site visit, program audit, or program interview, or as a guide when reviewing funding applications or reviewing a program’s policies and procedures.

Housing First Assessment Tool

2017
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

HUD continues to encourage Continuums of Care (CoCs) and providers to implement and strengthen Housing First approaches. To support these efforts, HUD has developed this Housing First Assessment Tool. This tool builds on the work of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness’s (USICH) Housing First checklist. It assists providers and CoCs to document how closely their projects align to the Housing First model. CoCs can use this tool to assess and measure a project’s progress in aligning with Housing First best practice standards, and an individual project can use this tool to identify what they are doing well and where improvements can be made.

Establishing Domestic Violence Housing First in California: A Process Evaluation

2017
Cris Sullivan
Jennifer Strom
Stephanie Fluegeman

In 2016, 8 agencies in California piloted the Domestic Violence Housing First Model (DVHF), an initiative that focuses on helping survivors get into safe and stable housing as quickly as possible, and on providing services to help them move forward with their lives. This process evaluation documents what it takes for agencies to implement the DVHF model and provides preliminary evidence for its impact on the lives of survivors and their children.

RESEARCH: Housing First Enhanced with Antiracism Practices Can Improve Housing Stability

2016
Vicky Stergiopoulos

Because of known differences in health care experiences and outcomes by race and ethnicity, researchers in Toronto tested the effectiveness of a Housing First program enhanced with antiracism and antioppression practices. The main principles of the antiracism and antioppression services delivered include empowerment, education, alliance building, language use, and advocacy. The study’s findings have key policy implications for Housing First interventions and suggest that Housing First enhanced with anti-racism and anti-oppression practices can improve housing stability and community functioning.

RESEARCH: Moving from Rhetoric to Reality: Adapting Housing First for Homeless Individuals with Mental Illness from Ethno-racial Groups

2012
Vicky Stergiopoulos

This research paper presents findings from an evaluation of a Housing First program for homeless individuals with mental illness in five cities across Canada. Conclusions from this research include that adapting Housing First with anti-racism/anti-oppression principles offers a promising approach to serving the diverse needs of homeless people from ethno-racial groups and strengthening the service systems developed to support them.

2021 Advocates' Guide

2021
National Low Income Housing Coalition

The Advocates’ Guide is a go-to resource for affordable housing and community development practitioners, advocates, and policymakers for detailed descriptions of every federal housing and community development program, as well as current challenges, opportunities, and practical strategies for addressing the shortfall in housing that is affordable and available to low income people and communities.

2013 Advocates' Guide to Housing and Community Development Policy

2013
National Low Income Housing Coalition

The National Low Income Housing Coalition publishes this guide in order to educate advocates of all kinds about the programs and policies that make housing affordable to low income people. The Guide includes an orientation to affordable housing and community development programs, explains how affordable housing works and why it is needed, and provides vital information to guide organizations and individuals in their advocacy efforts. Also includes information about the core affordable housing programs and policies that make housing and community development programs work on the ground.