Working Together to End Homelessness for Domestic and Sexual Violence Survivors and Their Families

The need for safe and affordable housing is one of the most vital and immediate concerns for survivors of violence and abuse. Black people, Indigenous people, and other person(s) of color are overrepresented in homeless populations due to structural racism, historical measures, network impoverishment, and other racial disparities across systems. 

View our first animation on The Intersection of Homelessness and Domestic Violence.

 

Welcome to Safe Housing Partnerships, the website for the Domestic Violence and Housing Technical Assistance Consortium! We hope you find useful resources and tools that advance your work at the critical intersection of domestic violence, sexual assault, homelessness, and housing. Please check back frequently, as we continue to add resources, tools, and best practices from the field.

Staff Picked Resources

Emergency Housing Vouchers: Guidance for Victim Service Providers

2021
Violence Free Minnesota
National Alliance for Safe Housing
National Network to End Domestic Violence

As part of the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), which was enacted into law in March 2021, Congress appropriated $5 billion for Emergency Housing Vouchers (EHVs) intended to assist individuals and families who are homeless or facing housing instability, as well as individuals and families who are fleeing or attempting to flee domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, stalking, or human trafficking. This document provides: 

  • An overview of the allocation and distribution process for EHVs; and
  • Recommended steps that victim service providers (VSPs), including culturally specific victim service organizations, serving domestic, sexual assault, and human trafficking survivors, can take to advocate for gender and racially equitable survivor access to these new resources.
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Survivors must often contend with substantial damage done to their credit, employment history, and general financial well-being. Many programs are exploring ways to directly address these challenges.

No matter how comprehensive your services, no one program can do it all. Partnerships and collaborations across systems can be a boon to ensuring that survivors receive the support they need.

Interpersonal violence is a leading cause of homelessness for women and children, and the need for safe and affordable housing is one of the most pressing concerns for survivors of violence and abuse. Many survivors face unique barriers to accessing shelter and affordable housing due to the power and control dynamics involved in these types of abuse and the economic and trauma impacts that result. These barriers are often exacerbated for those most marginalized in our society and with the least access to resources, including many survivors of color, Native Americans, immigrants, those living in poverty and geographically isolated, survivors with disabilities, and others. In addition, systemic factors such as institutional discrimination and the lack of affordable housing in communities create further challenges for many survivors. At the same time, housing programs can provide critical services for survivors and are often a key component in helping survivors find safety and stability.