Working Together to End Homelessness for Domestic and Sexual Violence Survivors and Their Families

The need for safe and affordable housing is one of the most vital and immediate concerns for survivors of violence and abuse. Black people, Indigenous people, and other person(s) of color are overrepresented in homeless populations due to structural racism, historical measures, network impoverishment, and other racial disparities across systems. 

View our first animation on The Intersection of Homelessness and Domestic Violence.

 

Welcome to Safe Housing Partnerships, the website for the Domestic Violence and Housing Technical Assistance Consortium! We hope you find useful resources and tools that advance your work at the critical intersection of domestic violence, sexual assault, homelessness, and housing. Please check back frequently, as we continue to add resources, tools, and best practices from the field.

Staff Picked Resources

Coordinated Entry: Confidentiality Requirements in Practice

2018
National Network to End Domestic Violence

This document provides guidance on coordinated entry (CE) model best practices. The guidance was developed based on feedback from practitioners in the victim services field who are currently participating in HUD Continuums of Care (CoCs) and are in compliance with the confidentiality-related legal requirements of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA). These insights aim to adhere to federal confidentiality requirements that were created to ensure safety by protecting the identities of victims of domestic violence, while simultaneously ensuring that those victims have access to the type of housing they need in their community of choice.

Flexible Funding for Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Survivors: Frequently Asked Questions

2019
National Alliance for Safe Housing
Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence

Flexible funding is financial support provided to survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault (DV/SA) to address whatever barrier exists between the survivor and safe housing stability. This document addresses frequently asked questions about flexible funding, including why it is an important housing strategy for survivors, what flexible funding can be used for, and more.

Federal Safe Housing Funding Chart

2020
DVHTAC TA Team

DVHTAC is excited to release this critical new resource for programs and communities serving survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking. The Federal Safe Housing Funding Chart outlines federal funding designated for safe housing, highlighting new/supplemental CARES Act funding as well as important information for new/current grantees. It can be used as a tool for programs wondering what kind of funding is available to them, as well as states and localities working to identify funding to supplement/fill in federal funding gaps or loopholes. 

Popular Resource Categories

Survivors’ economic challenges can take many forms and can threaten safety and housing stability. Flexible funds can make a significant difference, and programs that are using them are seeing great results.

Once consisting primarily of shelter, responses to homelessness and housing instability are now many and varied. 

Federal laws and policies have a significant impact on survivors' access to housing, and address topics including housing discrimination, emergency transfers, public housing, homelessness prevention, and more. This page provides links to the Violence Against Women Act, McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, the HEARTH Act, and other relevant provisions in the law.