Working Together to End Homelessness for Domestic and Sexual Violence Survivors and Their Families

Survivors of violence face real barriers when trying to access safe housing – barriers caused by the power and control dynamics of abuse, a need for safety and confidentiality, economic instability, the effects of trauma, and the lack of affordable housing in communities. Nobody should have to choose between staying in an unsafe home and having no home at all.

Welcome to Safe Housing Partnerships, the new website for the Domestic Violence and Housing Technical Assistance Consortium! We hope you find useful resources and tools that advance your work at the critical intersection of domestic violence, sexual assault, homelessness, and housing. Please check back frequently, as we’ll be continuously adding to the site over the coming months.

Staff Picked Resources

A Promising Approach to Prevent Homelessness for Domestic Violence Survivors

2016
Cris Sullivan
Heather Bomsta
Peg Hacskaylo

This presentation describes how flexible funds are employed in a DV housing program in Washington DC as a means to prevent homelessness for survivors. Further, it discusses the elements and results of a longitudinal pilot study that tested whether this project (DASH's Survivor Resiliency Fund) represents a promising strategy to prevent homelessness for survivors of intimate partner violence.

Technology and Confidentiality Resources Toolkit for Nonprofit Victim Service Agencies and Advocates

National Network to End Domestic Violence

Privacy and confidentiality is paramount to safety for victims and survivors of domestic and sexual violence. Yet victim service agencies may need to share information in many ways: with community partners, within community coordinated response teams, through referrals to other service providers, or in community-wide data collection initiatives. This website provides guidance for agencies in understanding their obligations to confidentiality in accordance to federal laws, best practices to ensure survivor-centered services, when and how much information to keep, and how best to share information with others.

Creating Safe Housing Options for Survivors: Learning From and Expanding Research

2017
Cris Sullivan

This research brief provides a brief overview of the current and expanding evidence behind best practices in helping domestic violence survivors obtain safe and stable housing. It begins with evidence for three common core components of this work: mobile advocacy, flexible funding, and attending to safety. It then provides evidence for how services should be provided: survivor-driven, trauma-informed, and voluntary.

FAQ - Coordinated Entry (CE) Process: A Resource for Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victim Service Providers

2017
National Alliance for Safe Housing
National Network to End Domestic Violence
National Resource Center on Domestic Violence
Collaborative Solutions

This FAQ tool has been developed in response to questions the Consortium has received from DV/SA advocates who are interesting in learning more about the Homeless Continuum of Care coordinated entry (CE) requirements and process to promote CE access and safe housing options for survivors. The FAQ draws from regulations and other guidance from HUD and USICH and offers strategies and resources for DV/SA providers who want to contribute to the creation and implementation of the CE process in their communities.

Domestic Violence Housing First Toolkit

2017
Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence

The Domestic Violence Housing First (DVHF) approach focuses on getting survivors of domestic violence into stable housing as quickly as possible and then continuing to provide support as they rebuild their lives. With safe and stable housing at its core, the key components of DVHF include: survivor-driven, trauma informed, mobile advocacy; flexible financial assistance; and community engagement. This toolkit is designed to provide materials and resources for organizations to use when developing or implementing the DVHF approach.

Popular Resource Categories

Funders require compliance with many laws and guidelines – from language access to data collection. Additionally, many promising practices can help shape your program. 

Information is empowering! This section is aimed at helping survivors have the information they need to address issues and challenges they may face as they pursue their housing goals.

Awareness of the laws that provide housing protections for survivors enhances our ability to be effective advocates.