National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

Understanding Traumatic Triggers

2011
National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

Survivors may have adopted long-term patterns that reflect their efforts to adapt to a traumatizing life. This brief information sheet summarizes basics about traumatic triggers and how they reflect survivors' strength and resiliency.

Tips for Using Video Conferencing for Victim Services

2015
National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

Videoconferencing can be a good option because it provides survivors with an alternative way to meet with a provider or counselor. Additional benefits include increasing accessibility and allowing survivors to talk to advocates who have expertise in whatever service the survivor needs, such as being able to speak the same language or understand the survivor’s cultural background. Using video conferencing can also save money and provide high quality contact for those who are unable to travel to the program’s location due to lack of transportation or because they live too far from the program. Video contact also can be more personal than a phone call or email.

Promising Practices and Model Programs: Trauma-Informed Approaches to Working with Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence and Other Trauma

2015
Heather Phillips, et al.
National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

Based on a series of interviews with model programs, this report looks at how DV/SA programs are currently conceptualizing trauma-informed and trauma-specific work and how this translates into enhanced or improved services for survivors of domestic and sexual violence - including in shelter and housing programs. Authors discuss aspects of trauma-informed services that were identified as especially meaningful to survivors and ways that programs are measuring outcomes and evaluating the impact of their work. Includes a look at culturally specific approaches to trauma and healing, including collective approaches, community-based practices, and those that can be offered by advocates and/or by trusted community members. Taken together, the information gathered from these interviews provides valuable insights on myriad ways to support survivors of domestic and sexual violence who may have experienced multiple traumatic experiences over the course of their lives.

Model Medication Policy for DV Shelters

2011
National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

As state domestic violence coalitions and local domestic violence programs across the country work to create more accessible and trauma-informed shelter programs, staff and advocates have sought guidance on designing medication policies that better serve survivors who are experiencing mental health symptoms or living with mental health disabilities. This Model Medication Policy for Domestic Violence Shelters, developed in response to these requests, is intended to provide coalitions and programs with guidance on designing medication policies that reflect survivor-centered values and to help to create more accessible and trauma-informed shelter environments. It also provides guidance on drafting policies that comply with ethical and legal obligations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Fair Housing Act (FHA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. These three federal statutes have implications for how domestic violence shelters screen and admit survivors and how they store and handle medications.

Creating Trauma-Informed Services: Tipsheet Series: Tips for Creating a Welcoming Environment

2011
National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

The environment we create communicates our beliefs about the people we serve. This environment and the way we offer services are critical aspects of our work to increase access to our programs for women who are experiencing psychiatric disabilities or the effects of trauma. This tipsheet provides guidance as to how to better ensure a welcoming environment for all survivors.

Creating Trauma-Informed Services Tipsheet Series: A Trauma-Informed Approach to Domestic Violence Advocacy

2011
National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health

Trauma-informed advocacy requires attending to survivors’ emotional as well as physical safety. It also means ensuring that the service delivery environment is inclusive, welcoming, destigmatizing, and non-retraumatizing. This document discusses five core components of a trauma-informed approach to domestic violence advocacy.